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Learning from other people's mistakes


| August 2016

Put yourself in the shoes of the examiner

We all know that we want to do better than our friends... but do we need to compete with them? One of the best things I did during high school was work with friends. We would both do a practice exam, and then trade papers at the end and mark each other's papers. This was good because we would mark eachother harshly, and have to justify why we gave (or didn't give) each other a mark. This meant that we had to dig deep to justify our knowledge and therefore had to understand what we were talking about. It also forced us to put ourselves in the shoes of the examiner. That is, in marking the exam paper, we would use the examiner's report as a base or a criteria to mark the question. This meant that we got an insight into what examiner's were looking for in answers.